Tag Archives: soviet troops

Armenia

Time Monday, Nov. 28, 1988
By PAUL HOFHEINZ YEREVAN

Almost every day for five weeks, a group of Armenians had huddled in the winter chill in front of Moscow’s six-story Supreme Court building, slapping their arms against the sides of their brown fur coats to keep warm. Their breath burst forth in clouds of pale steam as they talked quietly to one another, discussing the fate of those on trial.
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Newly-arrived troops struggle to halt a civil war

The Argus-Press – Jan 17, 1990

MOSCOW (AP) — More than 11.000 newly ar­rived troops fought today to end battles between bands of Azerbaijanis and Armenians, who reportedly were armed with everything from submachine guns and grenades to com­mandeered artillery.
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Civil war threatens in Soviet republics

The Fort Scott Tribune – Jan 15, 1990

MOSCOW (AP) — Azerbaijanis and Armenians appeared on the verge of open warfare today after a spasm of ethnic clashes and pogroms in the southern republic of Azerbaijan claimed at least 32 lives, Soviet media reported.
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Armenia and Its Neighbors Only Diverge

By BILL KELLER
Published: September 11, 1988

YEREVAN, U.S.S.R.— ONE balmy evening several days ago on the plaza outside the city opera house, a group of Armenians were playing Yerevan’s favorite guessing game: What if Armenia broke off from the Soviet Union and declared its independence? One man argued that this would be suicide. Armenia is a Christian island semi-surrounded by Moslims, including the historically hostile Turks. Alone, Armenia would perish, he said. But look at Israel, retorted a university student. A few million Jews in a sea of Arabs, but strong and free. Armenia can do the same. This won a murmur of approval.
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Armenian refugees who fled tell of being terrorized in Azerbaijan

St-Petersburg-Times-Jan23-1990
By ELIZABETH SHOGREN
Times Correspondent

MOSCOW — Sonya, a 25-year-old Armenian woman, choked back tears as she told other refu­gees how Azerbaijanis ransacked her apartment and killed her moth­er last week in the southern Soviet republic of Azerbaijan.
The young woman is among tens of thousands of Armenians who have fled Azerbaijan in the past 10 days, many of the refugees bringing nothing with them but the clothes on their backs.
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Armenian Capital is Roused by Calls for New Freedoms

September 5, 1988
By BILL KELLER, Special to the New York Times

YEREVAN, U.S.S.R., Sept. 4— Two nights ago, more than 100,000 Armenians, defying an official ban and a heavy police cordon, streamed into the square in front of this city’s imposing stone opera house for a town meeting.
The vast crowd in the southern republic’s capital was reminiscent of those in the heady days last February when Armenians began their campaign to claim the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, ruled by Azerbaijan. But there are two important differences.
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Fighting cools in Armenia, Azerbaijan

Sun Journal – Jan 26, 1990

MOSCOW (AP) – Warring nation­alists agreed Thursday to a cease­fire along one of the tense battlefronts of the bloody conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan, TASS said.
The announcement came as Baltic activists, worried that the dispute might affect their own peaceful push for independence, offered to help me­diate the blood feud between Arme­nia and Azerbaijan.
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3 Soviet Soldiers Die As Riots Flare Anew In Southern Region

By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times
Published: November 24, 1988

MOSCOW, Nov. 23— Three soldiers were killed and 126 people were injured in rioting in the southern republic of Azerbaijan on Tuesday, Soviet officials reported today.
The unrest stemmed from a continuing dispute over the status of Nagorno-Karabakh, an autonomous region of Azerbaijan where ethnic Armenians outnumber Azerbaijanis.
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Thousands call for strike, demand pullout of troops

Under the state of emer­gency proclaimed Saturday over the signature of Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorba­chev, all public gathering and strikes are banned. But troops have generally not tried to disperse crowds, apparently fearing massive resistance.
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Shoot to Put Down Caucasus Violence, Soviet Troops Told

The Daily Gazette – Jan 17, 1990
By ANN IMSE

MOSCOW (AP) — The Kremlin yesterday told the thousands of soldiers it sent to the Caucasus to shoot if need be to halt bands of Azerbaijani and Armenians fighting each other in hills around the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh.
Thousands of Armenian refugees poured from the southern republic of Azerbaijan, many beaten or chased from their homes by angry mobs. Some blamed the attacks on Azerbaijani who earlier fled ethnic violence in Armenia.
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