Tag Archives: soviet union

Armenia

Time Monday, Nov. 28, 1988
By PAUL HOFHEINZ YEREVAN

Almost every day for five weeks, a group of Armenians had huddled in the winter chill in front of Moscow’s six-story Supreme Court building, slapping their arms against the sides of their brown fur coats to keep warm. Their breath burst forth in clouds of pale steam as they talked quietly to one another, discussing the fate of those on trial.
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Newly-arrived troops struggle to halt a civil war

The Argus-Press – Jan 17, 1990

MOSCOW (AP) — More than 11.000 newly ar­rived troops fought today to end battles between bands of Azerbaijanis and Armenians, who reportedly were armed with everything from submachine guns and grenades to com­mandeered artillery.
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Armenia and Its Neighbors Only Diverge

By BILL KELLER
Published: September 11, 1988

YEREVAN, U.S.S.R.— ONE balmy evening several days ago on the plaza outside the city opera house, a group of Armenians were playing Yerevan’s favorite guessing game: What if Armenia broke off from the Soviet Union and declared its independence? One man argued that this would be suicide. Armenia is a Christian island semi-surrounded by Moslims, including the historically hostile Turks. Alone, Armenia would perish, he said. But look at Israel, retorted a university student. A few million Jews in a sea of Arabs, but strong and free. Armenia can do the same. This won a murmur of approval.
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THE WORLD; Gorbachev Is Feeling the Heat From the South

March 6, 1988
By PHILIP TAUBMAN

MOSCOW— MIKHAIL S. GORBACHEV begins his fourth year as Soviet leader this week probably worried less about the state of the economy than the stability of the state.
The nationalist unrest that shook the southern republics of Azerbaijan and Armenia in the last two weeks was a powerful reminder that for all the talk of economic and spiritual decay in the Soviet Union, ethnic instability may be the greatest long-term threat to the future of the country.
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28 Reported Killed in 2 Weeks in Strife in Soviet Caucasus Region

December 1, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, Thursday, Dec. 1— Soviet authorities reported that 28 people have been killed in the troubled Caucasus region in the last two weeks, while a rising flood of refugees were reported to be fleeing from ethnic violence in the area.

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Sakharov, in New Forum, Still Dissents

June 4, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, June 3— Andrei D. Sakharov spoke out today for his Government’s new strivings and against its old and continuing repressions, using the auditorium, microphones and translating services of the Soviet Foreign Ministry for words that not long ago would have been cause for criminal action.
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Armenians, Irate at Party Conference Results, Resume Wide Unrest

July 6, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, July 5— Widespread civil unrest began again in the southern republic of Armenia today as strikers closed the capital’s airport and many industrial enterprises, in pursuit of their demand for the transfer of a disputed region in neighboring Azerbaijan.
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Anger Alters the Chemistry of Armenian Protest

July 11, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, July 10— ”Our young women greeted the soldiers with flowers when they came in a few months ago,” a Yerevan resident, Samson Tomazyan, said today, a few minutes before he rose to address an angry crowd gathered at Moscow’s Armenian cemetery. ”They won’t be giving them flowers anymore.”
On July 5, the sporadic violence spawned by a resurgent territorial dispute between Armenia and neighboring Azerbaijan came home to Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. A 22-year-old demonstrator killed and 36 were wounded during a strike that shut down the main airport for at least 24 hours.
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Armenian refugees who fled tell of being terrorized in Azerbaijan

St-Petersburg-Times-Jan23-1990
By ELIZABETH SHOGREN
Times Correspondent

MOSCOW — Sonya, a 25-year-old Armenian woman, choked back tears as she told other refu­gees how Azerbaijanis ransacked her apartment and killed her moth­er last week in the southern Soviet republic of Azerbaijan.
The young woman is among tens of thousands of Armenians who have fled Azerbaijan in the past 10 days, many of the refugees bringing nothing with them but the clothes on their backs.
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Moscow Rejects Armenian Appeals

July 19, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, July 18— The Soviet Government today rejected appeals that it accommodate a southern enclave’s desire to break away from the republic of Azerbaijan, the press agency Tass said.
News of the unanimous decision was withheld from the main evening news broadcast, and a news conference that had been called to explain the decision of the emergency session of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet, the executive committee of the national legislature, was abruptly canceled.
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