Tag Archives: yerevan

Armenia and Its Neighbors Only Diverge

By BILL KELLER
Published: September 11, 1988

YEREVAN, U.S.S.R.— ONE balmy evening several days ago on the plaza outside the city opera house, a group of Armenians were playing Yerevan’s favorite guessing game: What if Armenia broke off from the Soviet Union and declared its independence? One man argued that this would be suicide. Armenia is a Christian island semi-surrounded by Moslims, including the historically hostile Turks. Alone, Armenia would perish, he said. But look at Israel, retorted a university student. A few million Jews in a sea of Arabs, but strong and free. Armenia can do the same. This won a murmur of approval.
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Armenians, Irate at Party Conference Results, Resume Wide Unrest

July 6, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, July 5— Widespread civil unrest began again in the southern republic of Armenia today as strikers closed the capital’s airport and many industrial enterprises, in pursuit of their demand for the transfer of a disputed region in neighboring Azerbaijan.
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Anger Alters the Chemistry of Armenian Protest

July 11, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, July 10— ”Our young women greeted the soldiers with flowers when they came in a few months ago,” a Yerevan resident, Samson Tomazyan, said today, a few minutes before he rose to address an angry crowd gathered at Moscow’s Armenian cemetery. ”They won’t be giving them flowers anymore.”
On July 5, the sporadic violence spawned by a resurgent territorial dispute between Armenia and neighboring Azerbaijan came home to Yerevan, the capital of Armenia. A 22-year-old demonstrator killed and 36 were wounded during a strike that shut down the main airport for at least 24 hours.
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Armenian Capital is Roused by Calls for New Freedoms

September 5, 1988
By BILL KELLER, Special to the New York Times

YEREVAN, U.S.S.R., Sept. 4— Two nights ago, more than 100,000 Armenians, defying an official ban and a heavy police cordon, streamed into the square in front of this city’s imposing stone opera house for a town meeting.
The vast crowd in the southern republic’s capital was reminiscent of those in the heady days last February when Armenians began their campaign to claim the territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, ruled by Azerbaijan. But there are two important differences.
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Moscow Rejects Armenian Appeals

July 19, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, July 18— The Soviet Government today rejected appeals that it accommodate a southern enclave’s desire to break away from the republic of Azerbaijan, the press agency Tass said.
News of the unanimous decision was withheld from the main evening news broadcast, and a news conference that had been called to explain the decision of the emergency session of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet, the executive committee of the national legislature, was abruptly canceled.
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Преступление против человечества

Г. УЛУБАБЯН,
член инициативной группы защиты прав сумгаитских армян,
официальное доверенное лицо родных погибших в Сумгаите армян.
Голос Армении, 2 февраля, 1991г.

«В настоящей конвенции под геноцидом понимаются следующие действия, совершаемые с намерением уничтожить, полностью или частично, какую-либо национальную, этническую, расовую или религиозную группу как таковую: а) убийство членов такой группы, б) применение серьезных телесных повреждений или умственного расстройства членам такой группы…».

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Soviet Armenians Mourn Their Dead

By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times
Published: March 9, 1988

MOSCOW, March 8— Tens of thousands of Armenians held a silent march and vigil in the Armenian capital of Yerevan this afternoon in memory of those slain in the recent rampages in the neighboring republic of Azerbaijan, according to Armenians and Westerners who were present.
At the same time, outside a small Armenian church in Moscow, witnesses to the violence that swept through Armenian sections of the Azerbaijani cities of Sumgait and Kirovabad eight days ago told disjointed, tearful tales of rape and butchery to a group of about 300 people.
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Legislature in Armenian Enclave Votes to Secede From Azerbaijan

July 13, 1988
By FELICITY BARRINGER, Special to the New York Times

MOSCOW, July 12— In a brash symbolic move likely to worsen a five-month territorial dispute, the ruling legislature of a predominantly Armenian enclave voted today to secede from Azerbaijan, the republic that has ruled the enclave for 64 years.
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Strike Ends in Armenia as Unrest Slows

By BILL KELLER, Special to the New York Times
Published: June 15, 1988

MOSCOW, June 14— Armenians ended a strike in the Armenian capital of Yerevan today as two Soviet republics moved toward a legal stalemate.
Residents said businesses reopened today after the leader of the Armenian Communist Party, Suren G. Arutyunyan, promised support Monday for the claim made by protesters to the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh.
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Soviet Drama: 3 Generals Held by Crowd

September 8, 1989
By BILL KELLER, Special to The New York Times

MOSCOW, Sept. 7— Three senior generals of the Soviet internal security forces were held hostage by a crowd of Azerbaijanis for five hours last week in the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh, officials disclosed today.
The generals, including the commander of all domestic troops for the Soviet Ministry of Internal Affairs, were released in exchange for a promise to transfer two Azerbaijanis accused of being snipers to an Azerbaijani prison, according to an official reached by telephone today in Stepanakert, the capital of Nagorno-Karabakh.
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